David Rumsey Map Center

An interactive cartographic journey at Stanford University

The David Rumsey Map Center is a unique collections-based research center in the Stanford University Library that enables and promotes interdisciplinary scholarship by enabling the use of cartographic information in all forms—from paper to digital. The new Map Center’s design integrates Mr. Rumsey’s collection with his dedication to providing an accessible and interactive experience with maps through the latest visualization and geospatial technologies.

“It’s one of the biggest private map collections around, but what’s more impressive from my perspective is that he’s [Rumsey] developed it almost as a public resource.”

Matt Knutzen

New York Public Library

Details and Team

Project Details

Stanford, CA

Location

3,975 SF

Size

$1.1M

Project Cost

2016

Completion Date
Team

Forell/Elsesser Engineers

Structural

Interface Engineering

Mechanical/Electrical/
Plumbing/Lighting

Charles M Salter Associates

AV/Telecom/Security/Acoustics

Matthew Williams Design

Signage

David Wakely Photography

Photographer
Project Details

Stanford, CA

Location

3,975 SF

Size

$1.1M

Project Cost

2016

Completion Date
Team

Forell/Elsesser Engineers

Structural

Interface Engineering

Mechanical/Electrical/
Plumbing/Lighting

Charles M Salter Associates

AV/Telecom/Security/Acoustics

Matthew Williams Design

Signage

David Wakely Photography

Photographer

The David Rumsey Map Center is a unique collections-based research center in the Stanford University Library that enables and promotes interdisciplinary scholarship by enabling the use of cartographic information in all forms—from paper to digital. The new Map Center’s design integrates Mr. Rumsey’s collection with his dedication to providing an accessible and interactive experience with maps through the latest visualization and geospatial technologies.

“It’s one of the biggest private map collections around, but what’s more impressive from my perspective is that he’s [Rumsey] developed it almost as a public resource.”

Matt Knutzen

New York Public Library